Discharge Line Trench and Front Yard Early Restoration: The trench is needed to bury the exterior discharge line from the sump pump and route the ground water to the storm sewer. The trench is usually 6-8 inches wide and 2-3 feet deep and the pipe installed below ground 4-inch diameter schedule 40 PVC.

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Sump Installation: Below shows different phases of the footing drain disconnection and sump pump installation. The leftmost picture shows 2 cleanouts where the upper(in picture) cleanout shows the footing drains (clay tiles) coming into the cleanout, which is then connected to the sanitary sewer line (bottom of picture). The middle picture shows the sump pump installed below the floor, the sump is about 24 inches in diameter, and the hole usually about 3-4 feet wide. In this particular installation the homeowner opted to upgrade to a water powered backup system which is why there are 2 PVC pipes sticking up out of the lid. To the right is a finished installation with a whole house check valve installed for at-risk homes.

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Check Valve Installation: To the right is a floor drain check valve in process of being installed. In the middle is floor drain check valve after the installation is completed. On the right is a check valve on a laundry tub, which is almost always installed above ground.

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Curb Drain Utility Installation: The pictures below illustrate two steps of the installation of the curb drain storm sewer extension that will eventually collect almost all of the sump pump flows. The curb drain is installed by a city hired contractor before the homeowners are notified that they need to disconnect their footing drains. The picture on the left shows the contractor potholing with a vacuum excavation truck (vactor truck) to locate any potentially conflicting utilities (usually gas lines) in the lawn extension between the sidewalk and curb. On the right it shows the directional drill rig that drills in the storm sewer without needing a long trench, minimizing excavation and disturbance. The left side of the picture shows a contractor using the vactor truck to remove the drilling fluid (water and clay).

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Curb Drain Inlet Tap and Restoration: The picture on the left shows the hydraulic drill equipment needed to connect the curb drain storm sewer extension to the back of a curb inlet (catch basin) along the street gutter. In this installation 2 pipes were connected to one curb inlet. The picture on the right shows the contractor restoring a sidewalk ramp that had to be disturbed in order to connect to the curb inlet. Usually this is not required as most curb inlets can be accessed without disturbing any sidewalk ramps.

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Air Gap Installation: The air gap is the unobstructed vertical space between the water outlet and the flood level of a fixture. To the left is an example of the air gap model installation used prior to 2012. To the right is an example of the modified model currently being used for the program.

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